Notice

Colin Mills, compiler of the Hortus Camdenensis, died in late November 2012 after a short illness. As he always considered the Hortus his legacy, it is his family's intention to keep the site running in perpetuity. It will not, however, be updated in the near future.

Camden Park House from the East Lawn. Photography by Leigh Youdale

Selected plants in the Hortus

Dianthus caryophyllus Sharpe’s ‘Invincible’

For generic information on the garden Carnation and Picotee see Dianthus caryophyllus L.  Sharpe’s ‘Invincible’ is a ‘light-edged purple, petals well formed, white good, and edging regular.’  [Gard. Chron. 1842].  ‘Pod good; petals well formed; ground pure; edging pretty regular.’  [FC p.79/1949].  ‘Another ex. ex. flower, with more stuff than the last named [‘Nulli secundus’] though perhaps not quite equalling it in other respects, still a desirable variety.’  [BF p.220/1844].

Added on April 12 2009

Moraea species unidentified

Unidentified species, no description.

Added on October 20 2009

Pyrus communis ‘Orange Bergamot’

‘Fruit, small; roundish turbinate. Skin, smooth, pale green, becoming yellowish green at maturity, with dull red next the sun, strewed with whitish grey dots. Eye, open, and set in a deep basin. Stalk, half an inch long, stout, inserted in a small cavity. Flesh, white, half-melting, juicy, with a sweet and musky flavour. A dessert pear; ripe in August.’ [Hogg – Fruit Manual p.625/1884].

Added on May 20 2010

Kohleria bogotensis Fritsch

It was described in the Ornamental Flower Garden as ‘a very handsome stove perennial with scaly tubers.  The stems grow erect, from 1 to 2 feet high, or sometimes more, bearing opposite leaves, of a broadly ovate form, beautifully variegated with bands of pale whitish blue on a ground of velvet of the deepest bronzy green.  The flowers grow on long peduncles from the axils of the leaves, the upper half of the tube and limb rich scarlet, the lower half yellow, marked on the face of the limb with dotted lines of scarlet.’  [OFG f.27/1854].  The accompanying figure shows a striking flower, its yellow throat spotted with brilliant crimson. 

Added on August 26 2009

Laurus nobilis L.

Frost hardy, evergreen conical tree or large shrub with glossy, ovate leaves, to 10cm long, and clusters of greenish flowers, to 5mm across, in spring, followed by black berries in female plants. To 12m.  [RHSE, Hortus. Hilliers’].

Added on March 03 2010

Crinum flaccidum Herb.

A variable deciduous species, with generally narrow, channelled leaves which tend to flop on the ground and which often die back in summer, and flattened stems, to 60cm long, bearing umbels of up to 8, fragrant, pure white or cream flowers that open widely.  The bulbs can be as much as 1m below ground.  [RHSD, FNSW].  Yellow-flowered forms have also been described from western South Australia and pink flowered forms from New South Wales.  [Hannibal Plant Life p.46/1963].  More recently crinums with deep yellow or pink flowers have been discovered in South Australia and Queensland, some of them possibly new species.  [Jim Lykos, personal communication].

Added on April 27 2009

Jubaea chilensis Baill.

Hardy, large palm with a distinctive columnar, grey trunk, which may be 2m or more in diameter and feathery, spreading fronds.  It produces long spathes which split to reveal numerous small, whitish flowers follwed by distinctive orange fruits.  Both the fruits and the kernels within resemble small coconuts.  To 25m.  [RHSD, Hortus, Jones – Palms]. 

Added on February 19 2009

News

Improvements to Hortus Camdenensis

The Hortus software has been upgraded. This led to some minor errors in the layout of plant names, particularly in the headings of Plant Profile pages but these have now been largely overcome. Improvements are also progressively being made to the content of the Hortus in three main areas, botanical and horticultural history, cross referencing and illustrations. Some enhancements will be done as the opportunity arises but most will be completed family by family. This will take at least two years to complete.

 

 

Published Sep 14, 2010 - 04:06 PM | Last updated Aug 12, 2012 - 04:36 PM

Sir William Macarthur on Vines and Vineyards

Sir William Macarthur wrote extensively on vines and Vineyards. It is our intention to publish all his writings in the Hortus.

Published Aug 01, 2010 - 04:58 PM | Last updated Oct 04, 2010 - 04:47 PM

Working Bee dates

Working Bee dates for 2012.

 

Published Jun 29, 2010 - 02:59 PM | Last updated Jan 10, 2012 - 05:19 PM

Open House and Gardens

Camden Park House and Gardens will be open to the public on Saturday 22nd September, 2012, from 12.00 noon until 4.00 pm, and Sunday 23rd from 10.00 am until 4.00 pm.

 

Published Dec 30, 2009 - 02:58 PM | Last updated Jan 09, 2012 - 05:31 PM

Essays

Letters on the Culture of the Vine Part 6: The Vintage

Letters on the Culture of the Vine and Manufacture of Wine by Maro, pen-name of William Macarthur. Letters IX, X and XI deal with the vintage, including the theory and practice of fermentation and preparation for winemaking. The process of winemaking is dealt with in more detail in subsequent letters. The illustration used here is a wine label from the 1852 Muscat vintage. Follow this link to further examples of wine labels from this period.

The entire book is reproduced in the Hortus in ten parts. For background information and Macarthur’s Introduction to the book see Part 1.

Published Sep 15, 2010 - 03:53 PM | Last updated Jul 21, 2011 - 11:15 AM

Rambles in New Zealand - part 3

Rambles in New Zealand is the only published work of John Carne Bidwill of any length and an important document in the early colonial history of that country.
It is included in the Hortus for a number of reasons but mainly because, together with his letters to The Gardeners’ Chronicle, it completes the known published works of Bidwill. His importance in the history of the Camden Park gardens and the lack of any substantive treatment of his life and achievements make it appropriate to include all his published work here.
Rambles is published here in four parts:
Part 1 – dedication, Preface, pages 1-29
Part 2 – pages 30-59
Part 3 – pages 60-89
Part 4 – pages 90 -93, List of Subscribers

 

Published Feb 29, 2012 - 02:11 PM | Last updated Mar 01, 2012 - 07:02 AM

Florists’ flowers

Floristry, in the 17th, 18th and 19th century meaning of the word, the growing and improvement of flowering plants for the sake of their beauty alone, has a long history in China and Asia but is of relatively recent origin in Europe.  From quite humble beginnings, the small scale leisure activity of artisans and labourers, it attracted the attention of the owners of the great pleasure gardens and botanic gardens of Europe.  Specialised nurseries began to appear to service great and small gardens, providing a means of disseminating the beautiful new varieties which the nurseries were both breeding and obtaining from enthusiastic amateurs.

Published Mar 12, 2010 - 03:41 PM | Last updated Jun 27, 2010 - 05:30 PM

Rambles in New Zealand - Part 1

Rambles in New Zealand is the only published work of John Carne Bidwill of any length and an important document in the early colonial history of that country.
It is included in the Hortus for a number of reasons but mainly because, together with his letters to The Gardeners’ Chronicle, it completes the known published works of Bidwill. His importance in the history of the Camden Park gardens and the lack of any substantive treatment of his life and achievements make it appropriate to include all his published work here.

Rambles is published here in four parts:
Part 1 – dedication, Preface, pages 1-29
Part 2 – pages 30-59
Part 3 – pages 60-89
Part 4 – pages 90 -93, List of Subscribers

 

Published Feb 29, 2012 - 08:45 AM | Last updated Feb 29, 2012 - 03:08 PM

About the Hortus

The Hortus attempts to correctly identify, describe, illustrate and provide a brief history of all the plants grown at Camden Park between c.1820 and 1861.

Plants in the Hortus

The Hortus plants served a wide range of purposes: ornament, living fences, fibre, dyestuffs, medicine, food from the garden and orchard, and many others.

Plant Families

Plants in the Hortus are grouped by Family, perhaps the most useful of the higher order classifications.

Essays

Essays enhance the Hortus by providing a level of detail about the gardens, people, and plants that would be inappropriate for an individual plant profile.

Hortus News

News provides an opportunity for people interested in the gardens to keep in touch with the work being done to maintain and reinvigorate the gardens and receive advance notice of events such as Open Garden days.